The Ideologues of the Gaming Control Board


June 24, 2018
The Ideologues of the Gaming Control Board

For the most part the rank and file members of the Nevada Gaming Control Board are above and beyond reproach. They are hardworking, dedicated and good citizens serving Nevada and keeping casino gambling on the straight and narrow. The following comments are not directed to these fine people. These comments are directed to the powers to be that allows the GCB to continually hide and suppress public information behind an archaic Nevada law: NRS 463.335(16) and under the provisions of NRS Chapter 239.
This law keeps the facts, historical data and the truth from the public. The law makes it illegal for the GCB to release anything about a gaming licensee or investigation to practically anyone.  This means they won’t give you a photo of a past legendary deceased hotel owner, or a picture of an interior of an imploded casino, if they had one.  And what about the interesting cases that were investigated 30 or 40 years ago.  Everyone in the case has passed away, and yet they won’t reveal anything to a person requesting some information.  A STONE WALL!
Nevada’s gaming regulators use this law as dictators over the public in a manner that is unjust competition. When they need to inspect, peruse or examine a fact in a file, they can do so under the precept that it is within the law, yet if a subject of the file needs to defend him or herself it practically take an act of Congress to even look at what is even contained in the secret file. Even a person who has been investigated by the secretive Gaming Control Board isn’t even allowed to view their own file.

Even a researcher who wants to historical facts about a deceased gaming operator regarding confirmation of employment in a vintage casino in the 1970s is denied.
This is beyond reasonable and in the spirit of fair dealing and there must be a reason that the GBC wants to keep this information secret. Perhaps a legitimate right of privacy excuse would apply in some cases. Certainly sensitive personal information should not be disclosed that could cause harm to a living subject if the file. But in the case of deceased gaming licensees and investigations of these persons, keeping this information in a vault is akin to a dictatorship running our state.
The reason of protecting Nevada Gaming from innuendo, speculation and the possibility of bad press is not acceptable in this new age of social media and 24/7 worldwide news facilities.

The files in the secret vaults of the Gaming Control Board are valuable to history and accuracy. The FBI has released much of the information via the FOIA and is available to the public for a postage stamp. So why then, has the GCB not released the same information. Is it because of the fear of a lawsuit? The last time this writer checked the law, a dead man could not file a law suit.

There are hundreds if not thousands of files in the secret protected filing cabinets of the Nevada’s Gaming Control Board that belong to the educational curriculum of gaming history.  Try to search the internet to find a picture of Ed Torres or Maurice Friedman.  Good luck!

The reason the Fascist high lamas at the GCB may have another reason that they don’t want this information released and open for research is because there may be many smoking guns in the files that implicate past Gaming Commission and Gaming Control Board members in wrongdoing, unfair dealing and flat out criminal activity.

I say fellow Nevadans, petition your Assembly persons, write letters to your State Senators and initiate action to change NRS 463.335(16) certain provisions of NRS Chapter 239, and rewrite this archaic law to a more reasonable and open legislation.

Here is an example of a request for a simple request of verification of employment of Larry Snow (Snofsky), a former Baccarat gaming executive at Caesars Palace and who was once turned down for a gaming license at the historic Moulin Rouge in 1951-52.

Mr. Munari,

We have looked into your Public Records Request dated, November 19, 2017. It is our understanding that you are looking for all documents pertaining to Larry Snofsky’s (aka Snow) employment at either the Dunes Hotel or Sands Hotel. The Nevada Gaming Control Board does not maintain employment records from the Dunes Hotel or Sands Hotel. Please contact those companies directly.

Thank you,

XXXX XXXXXXXXX
Administrative Assistant III
Administrative Division
Nevada Gaming Control Board

COMMENT ON THE ABOVE RESPONSE     Does the Gaming Control Board realize that the Sands and the Dunes are out of business?  And to tell me that they have NO records on a man that they once turned down for a license, then allowed him to work as the Baccarat Manager at Caesars Palace,  is ridiculous!

Mr. Munari,
The Board has no information to confirm whether Larry Snofsky was employed with the Sands Hotel. Please call me if you need further clarification.
Thank you,
Barbara Bolton, MBA
Information Management Coordinator
Custodian of Records
Nevada Gaming Control Board
From: Geno Munari
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 5:53 PM
To: Bolton, Barbara
Cc: Administration – RecordsResearch – CC <RecordsResearchCC@gcb.nv.gov>
Subject: Re: Public Records Request – Munari
TO: Barbara Bolton
I am an receipt of your letter explaining your position regarding my request for verification of employment of Larry Snofsky. You write, “The Board is entrusted with maintaining the confidential nature of the Board’s work product, employment registration information, and privileged information and, therefore, is unable to comply with the request.”
What I question is why is a simple employment verification from a period of 40 plus years ago, of a person that is deceased, considered a confidential nature and privileged information?
No harm can come from the release of this information, and appears to me that it could be released if the GCB wanted to release it. From what you replied it appears that you do have discretion in releasing certain information.
Please explain what the criterion is for the GCB to release information if it decides to do so, or better put: what constitutes the information to be sensitive after 40 years?
The reason I am asking this is because you indicated in a previous email that you needed to check with the Attorney General’s office. The mere fact that you suggested this indicates that the NRS statue permits release of information that the GCB does not consider confidential and privileged.
Most sincerely
Geno Munari
________________________________________
From: Bolton, Barbara
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 3:48:59 PM
To: munari@msn.com
Cc: Administration – RecordsResearch – CC
Subject: Public Records Request – Munari
Mr. Munari,
I am in receipt of your two emails: November 19, 2017 Public Records Request to the Gaming Control Board and December 13, 2017 to Nevada Gaming Commission Chairman Alamo. Both emails seek information/verification with regard to Larry Snofsky aka Larry Snow and his employment history at the Sands Hotel and Dunes Hotel and Country Club.
The Nevada Public Records Act does not mandate that state agencies provide information upon request by the public but, instead, requires the production of documentation that it maintains as public record. In addition, documentation maintained by the Board related to gaming employee registrations is deemed confidential pursuant to NRS 463.335(16) and under the provisions of NRS Chapter 239, the Board is only required to produce public records, upon request, that are not otherwise deemed confidential. Pursuant to NRS 239.010, confidential documents are not public records. The Board is entrusted with maintaining the confidential nature of the Board’s work product, employment registration information, and privileged information and, therefore, is unable to comply with the request.
Separately, and in your December 13, 2017 email, you mentioned the Moulin Rouge. I have attached a copy of the only public document the Board can provide relative to Mr. Snofsky’s. No other information can be provided to you at this time.
Thank you,
Barbara Bolton, MBA
Information Management Coordinator
Custodian of Records
Nevada Gaming Control Board